UPDATE: Pussy Riot Posts New Music Video

Putin will teach you how to love

 

Original Post

Members of Pussy Riot were attacked by police with whips, then beaten, pushed, dragged and had their hair pulled as the punk performance group set up for an unpermitted performance in front of a mural in Sochi. There were plenty of cameras to capture the brutality of the special Cossack police, hired to handle drunks and rowdies. Yesterday, Pussy Riot members and their entourage were arrested briefly by police in Adler, a suburb of Sochi, on suspicion of theft. The band tweeted after their arrest Tuesday they were in Sochi to film a performance called called Putin Will Teach You to Love the Motherland.

In an interesting side note, this version of Pussy Riot–which includes the feminist collective’s most famous members Nadezhda Tolokonnikova and Maria Alyokhina were arrested, charged with hooliganism, sentenced to prison and released under Putin’s PR amnesty in December 2013–has a dude in the performance. Pussy Riot was originally formed as separatist feminist collective. Recently, anonymous members of Pussy Riot emailed an open letter to supporters, and posted it on their LiveJournal, stating that Nadia and Masha are no longer members of Pussy Riot, and that

We are all-female separatist collective—no man can represent us either on a poster or in reality.

Slate explains:

Technically speaking, it’s hard to see how anyone can “quit” Pussy Riot, since its membership was never really firmly defined in the first place. Beginning as a side project of the radical art collective Voina, the number of members of the group varied depending on the performance.

And earlier this month

Tolokonnikova and Alyokina insisted they were still members of the band and were “still in contact with … the people we performed with” at the infamous performance in a Moscow cathedral.

They were reportedly planning to run for office in Moscow’s local government.

The name “Pussy Riot” carries a certain value and weight for Tolokonnikova and Alyokhina. Their sister members may not be happy with what they are doing, and may feel it runs contrary to the groups original goals of

feminism, separatist resistance, fight against authoritarianism and personality cult

But can anyone female, male, trans put on brightly colored clothes with a neon knit balaclava, and begin shouting songs with these goals on the a corner and feel they are Pussy Riot? And would dozens of Pussy Riots across the globe weaken or strengthen the original group’s goals and methods?

 

Photos: Screenshots from Telegraph UK video above